I am sure most of you use the GoPro for shooting videos only. However, the GoPro is a capable camera and with the right setting it can take amazing photos. In this video I go through my preferred photo settings and also show the difference between Standard, HDR, SuperPhoto, and RAW output formats.

How To Best Set Up Your GoPro HERO8 For Shooting Photos

Let me introduce the Sony RX0 II Vlogging Setup with the UURig C-RX0 II Vlogging Case, so you get the most out of your little camera. It’s a perfect protective cage for the Sony RX0 II with 37mm thread adapter to mount an ND filter and a cold shoe mount to attach an external microphone. Here are the links to all the gear I used for this setup.

Camera Cage : https://amzn.to/30fwf2H
ULANZI L1 Pro Video Light : https://amzn.to/2HhD50c
ULANZI Aluminum Grip: https://amzn.to/2VlvuBk
MicW iShotgun : https://amzn.to/2YnOwJi
Hoya 52mm Variable ND Filter : https://amzn.to/2Q2IQSa
FiiO Audio Cable : https://amzn.to/2Vi6LOj

Sony RX0 II Vlogging Setup (Camera Cage and ND Filter for Sony RX0 II)

Live streaming has become immensely popular over the years. Whether Facebook, YouTube, Periscope, Twitch – there are plenty of options for your online live show. The technical aspect of building a live streaming setup can be intimidating, however, GoPro makes it very easy with its GoPro App. Let me show you how it works.

Just in case you want to have a bit more options and flexibility, you can capture the live feed of your camera’s HDMI out with a inexpensive capture card (Elgato CamLink 4K, BlackMagic UltraStudio MiniRecorder) and use OBS Studio on your PC or Mac.

As you can tell, live streaming isn’t complicated and camera companies like GoPro make it very easy to share your story in the moment with either family, friends, or even a wider audience on YouTube and Facebook. If want to learn more about making the most of your camera, please subscribe to my YouTube channel.

How To Live Stream with GoPro

Photography/Cinematography filters are glass elements that get typically screwed onto the front of the camera lens. While some use filters to simply protect the front elements of the lens, there are a variety of filters available that allow for artistic control over the photo or video. Using filters is common among DSLR/mirrorless shooters, however, filters can be easily used for shooting with your GoPro also. They are a lot of fun!

In this video I explain how to easily attach a filter to your GoPro. Further below you’ll find an outline of what the different filters do and how they are being typically used.

UV Filter:

Primarily used for protecting the lens. However UV filters can help with:

  • Boost contrast when shooting outdoors
  • Removes UV light and blue cast in very bright sun light

CPL Filter:

Reduces the polarization effect caused by sunlight:

  • Enhances the color of the sky
  • Eliminates the reflection visible in water/glass

ND Filter:

Blocks light, so that less light passes through the lens reaching the sensor:

  • Allows for creative control over the shutter speed
  • Allows for maintaining a 180 angle shutter speed in bright sun light for video

Graduated Filters:

Adds artistic effects to photos/video:

  • Orange: to intensify the orange and red of a sunset
  • Blue: to intensify ocean or blue sky
  • Grey: to intensify/add drama to a cloudy sky

 

Filters being used in this video:

SUREWO CPL/UV Lens Filter 52mm : http://geni.us/GPRFLTR
TELESIN GoPro ND 4/8/16 Lens Filter : http://geni.us/GPRND
K&F Concept 52mm Lens Filter Kit : http://geni.us/KFFilter

How to use Cinematic Filters with your GoPro